Dr. Thomas Clark's Kentucky Treasures
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Cumberland Gap and the Narrows

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  • Cumberland Gap and the Narrows formed a path for early explorers and settlers to reach the land now called Kentucky. The flood of settlers began after 1775, when DAniel Boone and his group blazed a trail from the gap to the Kentucky River.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917465
  • Photos by Charles Bertram

Cane Ridge Meeting House

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  • Events at this log church in Bourbon County more than 200 years ago helped change the course of religion inn America. Built by Presbyterians out of Blue Ash logs in 1791, it is still thought to be the largest single-room log structure in the United States.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917415
  • Photos by Charles Bertram

Fitchburg Iron Furnace

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  • Fitchburg Furnace, built in 1868 in Estill County by brothers Frank and Fred Fitch was considered the largest stone furnance in the world when it opened. It was two furnaces in one, 60 feet tall and 115 feet long. It closed in 1873.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917487
  • Photos by Charles Bertram

Lilley Cornett Woods

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  • Lilley Cornett Woods in Letcher County is one of the few places where Kentucky's ancient past remains alive and unchanged, to be seen just as the first white explorers found it more than 200 years ago.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917515
  • Photos by Charles Bertram

Mammoth Cave National Park

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  • Located near the Green River, about 30 miles north of Bowling Green, this Kentucky landmark is know worldwide. Mammoth Cave is recognized as the most extensive cave system on earth, at least three times longer than any other known cave.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917519
  • Photos by David Stephenson

Speed Art Museum

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  • Louisville's Speed Art Museum opened in 1927 as the J.B. Speed Memorial Museum of Fine Arts. At the time, Kentucky had no notable art museums or galleries, but the Speed changed that. Today, now five times its original size, the Speed is Kentucky's largest art museum.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917533
  • Photos by Charles Bertram

Abbey of Gethsemani

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  • One of Dr. Thomas Clark's Kentucky Treasure's, The Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani was founded in 1848 in Nelson County.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917392
  • Photos by David Stephenson

Augusta

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  • The little Ohio River town of Augusta lies between Cincinnati and Maysville. The town entered official records in the 1790's. Early on it was a stopping place for keelboats and flatboats traveling the Ohio River.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917407
  • Photos by Charles Bertram

Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill

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  • The Shakers bought property in Mercer County in 1806, added more acreage in 1808 and named their community Pleasant Hill. Officially know as the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, the name Shaker came from their ecstatic style of worship, in which men and women experienced emotional trembling or shaking.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917524
  • Photos by David Stephenson

Falls of the Ohio

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  • This spot on the Ohio River at present day Louisville, was an important launching pad for much of Kentucky and United States history. The falls were a stopping and meeting place for Native Americans long before white people arrived. During pioneer days, the rapids constituted the only interruption to navigation along the entire length of the Ohio River.
  • 10/13/2005
  • Album ID: 917476
  • Photos by Charles Bertram
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